writingweasels

nubbsgalore:

baby japanese macaques, aslo known as snow monkeys, in the joshinetsu kogen national park. located in the valley of the yokoyu river in the northern part of nagano prefecture, the areas remains relatively free of humans thanks to heavy snowfalls, an elevation of 850 meters, and being accessible only via a narrow two kilometer footpath through the forest.

photos by (click pic) ben torodeoscar tarneberg, kiyo photography, stephano sityziakoichi kamoshidamarcosjra and patypatyapaty, tubasa-wingsdaisuke tashiro and masashi mochida

yeahwriters
theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920